Trump Ends Temporary Protected Status For 200,000 El Salvadorans

Jake Baker  ·  January 08, 2018  ·  Featured, Foreign Policy, Immigration, Terror, Left Wing Ideology, Leftist Bullies, U.S. News, Crime and justice, Culture


President Donald Trump’s deputies are ending the often-extended ‘TPS’ temporary refugee status for up to 200,000 El Salvadoran migrants, which was first granted when earthquakes hit their home country in 2001.

The TPS decision — reported by numerous media outlets — underlines Trump’s determination to enforce the nation’s immigration laws, and to push his “Buy American, Hire American”  inauguration-day promise, despite growing pressure from the GOP’s business-first wing, Democrats and their allies in the establishment media.

The decision also pressures Democrats to accept Trump’s immigration reforms —  or else run as the pro-amnesty political party in November 2018.

The secretary of the Department of Homeland Security is responsible for deciding whether or not to extend TPS status, based on whether the original disaster is still damaging the country. Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen is Trump’s DHS secretary.

Most of the 200,000 El Salvadoreans will return home by September 2019, likely boosting the small nation’s economy with savings and skills earned in the United States during the last 17 years.

The decision will free up jobs for American citizens and other legal immigrants.

Many of the El Salvador migrants were living illegally in the United States when the earthquake hit their home country in 2001. Since then, the “Temporary Protected Status” has been 11 times by Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama.


An official at the Comite Hispano de Virgina in Falls Church takes a photo of Salvadoran national Douglas Garcia Martinez 11 November, 2002, to attach to his paperwork to extend his Temporary Protected Status (TPS).

The Washington Post offered several examples of illegals who have used the TPS program to establish themselves in the United States:

Losing TPS “would be catastrophic for my family,” said Edwin Murillo, a 41-year-old father of two reached by phone at his home in Texas …

Murillo had studied business administration in El Salvador but left in 1999 because, he said, jobs were scarce. He entered the United States on a visa, which he overstayed, and in 2001, following the earthquakes back home, he and his wife jumped at the chance to apply for TPS.

A second  Washington Post article quoted two more illegals who used the TPS program:

[Oscar] Cortez, a father of two, said he came to the United States in 2000, after he dropped out of college in El Salvador because he couldn’t afford the tuition and was downsized out of a job at a textile factory. Undocumented at first, he worked low-wage, sporadic jobs laying carpet or cutting lawns …

His co-worker Jaime Contreras, a welder on the project that will extend Metrorail to Dulles International Airport, said his job has transformed his family’s lives, both in Maryland and in El Salvador. As a child in El Salvador, Contreras went to school in the mornings and to work in the afternoons, painting houses at age 7 and welding at 11.

At 20, he moved to the United States seeking higher wages.

Trump’s deputies have also ended TPS status for migrants from several other countries, including Haiti and Nicaragua. DHS deputy secretary Elaine Duke, however, gave a short extension to 57,000 Hondurans in late 2017.

Democrats and pro-migration advocates strongly criticized the decision to end temporary protected status for the El Salvador migrants:


Article source:

El Salvador, MS 13, $18 Trillion, Donald Trump, Immigration, Temporary Protective Status

Be the first to comment!

To leave a comment, please Login or Register